From Fear Can Come Much Faith…

“Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”  ~Marie Curie

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We’re all afraid sometimes. It’s part of the human condition. Rational fears of a real danger mobilize to positive action. But fears of imagined threats can be destructive and immobilize to exhaustion. We deal with both as we move along our day-to-day path. And it’s helpful to understand what it is we’re dealing with.

A few years ago, I was in a serious car wreck caused by a driver making an illegal turn in front of my car at an intersection. My foot immediately slammed on the brake. Panic and fear gripped my senses, and I couldn’t stop screaming until impact suddenly stopped my car. I spent 4 days in the hospital and 2 months in a nursing home for rehab. I went from a wheelchair to a walker and then a cane. Yes, real dangers need positive action. But fears we conjure up in our minds take their toll in unnecessary stress and worry.

So what are you afraid of? What scares you? Does your mind sometimes drift into “what if” thinking, and you function from a state of fear? What if…I don’t get the job, I make a mistake, this person leaves me, I get sick again, I look foolish, my plan doesn’t work. What if…what if….  It doesn’t get you anywhere, does it? But we all do it.

“Faith and Fear both demand you believe in something you cannot see. You choose.”  ~Bob Proctor

We can’t see into the future, so everything in life is unpredictable. Caution is useful, but fear of the unknown can become a damaging habit. Usually, it begins with doubt, then you worry, and then fear sets in. Can you imagine how much negative energy you’re pouring into a situation? You’re already contaminating it. And your mind has chosen that route. But you have the power to choose freedom.

An effective way to stop a fear habit is to replace it with a habit of faith. And that takes some monitoring of your thinking patterns. Once you identify your doubt, worry, and fear, then you can do something about it. When you feel that first bit of discomfort in the pit of your stomach, go inside and clarify your feelings, honestly. And begin confronting those feelings.

“Don’t be afraid of change, because it is leading you to a new beginning.” ~Joyce Meyer

I’m a believer in denials and affirmations to change our feelings about something. We can’t deny our emotions, but we can deny them any power over us. Pull the fear up to the surface and talk to it like you would another person. “Okay, fear, I know you’re there. But I deny you have any power over me. You’re no bigger than a fly on a horse’s rump, so you might as well go away. I’m done with you.” Then affirm the truth about the situation. “I release you now and affirm my freedom from you through the real Power of faith within me. I am a precious child of the Universe, untouched by your mischief. So get out of my life.” Use whatever words you’re comfortable with, but be firm in your faith, faith in the truth of who you are.

Ridding yourself of unwanted emotions isn’t easy, and it takes practice. But as time passes, you’ll feel a shift of courage within you, and you’ll smile. As Maya Angelou says, “Courage is fear that has said its prayers.” Not every situation in your life will turn out the way you want it, but you can avoid those negative feelings, and walk your path with courage and faith. It’s like having a tool in your pocket when your human self gets in the way of your sacred Self. Life is not for living in fear. It’s for learning and growing and feeling happy.

I wish you faith-filled walks through each experience in your life.

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Author, Marilyn Fowler

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How to Deal With Shock in Your Life.


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It’s just a shock. You go from one day to everything being OK to your life being upside down.” ~ Amber Margarejo

We’ve just come through a stressful presidential election like nothing I’ve seen in my lifetime. And whether you’re happy or sad about the outcome, the final result was a shock not only in our country, but in much of the world. As I observe people’s reactions to this situation, I’m reminded of other shocking situations we sometimes encounter in our own personal lives and/or collectively. 

Shock over happy outcomes passes quickly. But sudden traumatic situations can affect us physically, mentally, emotionally, and/or spiritually. The degree of shock depends upon each individual’s perception of the event and personal situation at the time. What’s mild to one person can be serious to another. When we know what’s coming, our body begins preparing for it. If not, the sudden element itself can render the mind helpless to think clearly. It shakes our sense of reality of who we are, how we live our life, our expectations, our perception of truth, etc. and we must go through a series of adjustments to healing.

“Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway.” ~Actor, John Wayne

I remember a personal shock I experienced a few years ago. During the many years I worked, I faithfully invested into my retirement fund. But 3 years into retirement, I suddenly learned that due to neglect by the person handling my account, I’d lost my retirement fund. It was gone. Nothing to show for all those years. At first it was difficult to believe the reality of the situation. I was in shock, and felt devastated, scared and helpless. But somehow prayer sustained me and I survived…wiser than before.

Another time I experienced a shock felt by the whole world. I still remember it vividly. I was a child listening to the radio with my mother and brothers when suddenly the program was interrupted with news that Japanese planes had bombed our ships in Pearl Harbor. My mother’s first instinct was to run, and she quickly hurried us up the street to my aunt’s house. I remember hysterical neighbors pouring out of their houses, grouping together in the street, fearful about what might happen next. I didn’t fully understand what was happening, but I felt that emotional shock.

“Accept, then act. Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it. Always work with it, not against it.”  ~ Eckhart Tolle

A personal shock can put your body in an almost nonfunctional mode with questions like, “Why did this happen? What am I going to do now? What will happen to me?” You may feel that life has thrown you more than you can handle, and there’s no place to run. So your first survival mode is to stop, breathe deep, quiet your mind, and accept where you are without resistance. And if prayer is part of your life, pray for peace and guidance.

Allow yourself to calm down as much as possible, and for a while concentrate only on yourself. Cling to what’s real and valuable in your life, and list what you have that’s safe and dependable. What does your well-being depend on, and do you have that? If not, how can you create it? Be kind to you, and seek support from people in your life who will listen to you and offer understanding and compassion.

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“You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only choice.” ~ Bob Marley

As your mind clears, take time to digest what’s happened. Ask yourself how might the new situation change your life, or does it? Can you mend what’s broken, or do you have to let go? Does the situation need your immediate attention, or is it out of your control? And establish what’s yours to do, or not do. Then move forward from there.

If the shocking situation is more on a collective level, seek out others and share your thoughts and feelings. Whatever the cause, shock needs to be dealt with in order to heal and move on. Know that you have what it takes to accomplish this. And you will.

I Wish You Peaceful Times Ahead!

Marilyn Fowler, Author and Writer
Contributor at  “Keys To Recovery Newspaper”
http://www.keystorecoverynewspaper.com/

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